Third World All Stars

Pressure Sounds * PS78 * 2013

Rebel Rock

Rebel Rock

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Information

The basis of the Third World Allstars were in fact usually visiting Jamaican musicians plus a pick of the session me available in London. The instrumental album “Rebel Rock” derives the majority of its rhythms from Errol Dunkley’s album “Sit And Cry Over You” released by Shelley produced and arranged, and probably engineered, by the great Sid Bucknor. For the instrumental version the overdubs and remixes were done at the Chalk Farm and E.F.M. (better known as Berry Street) studios with a credited line up of Rico Rodriguez on trombone, Eddie “Tan Tan” Thornton on trumpet, Michael 'Bammi’ Rose on sax, Lester Sterling trumpet and saxophone, Buggis Norman on alto sax, “Organ D” aka Tyrone Downie on keys and “Ronnie Bop” aka Ranford Williams on guitar. The original backing tracks for the Dunkley album were by Gladdy Anderson & his All Stars so its likely that featuring bassist Jackie Jackson, drummer Winston Grennan, guitarist Hux Brown and keyboardist Winston Wright may be in the mix. The title track “Rebel Rock” was originally derived from Gene Rondo’s single “Rebel Woman” issues by Shelly on his Queen Bee subsidiary in 1974 and the track that opens side two “Black Moon” is from the Ginger Williams single “There is Something in my Heart” issued on the Paradise label. As is usual when quality Jamaican sessioneers get together free quotes from jazz standards and ballads can be found interspersed with re-utilised rhythms, so “Repatriation Remedy” can not only be traced back to Errol Dunkley’s “Repatriation” but also to Bunny & Skitter on their Studio one single “Lumumbo” and even before that Willie Bobo’s “Spanish Grease”.



As the seventies moved on Count Shelly relocated his operations to New York and eventually his Super Power Records in Brooklyn became the reggae shop of choice through the dancehall and digital eras, a meeting place for the movers and shakers of the time. Located on Church Avenue between Utica Avenue and E 49th Street in Flatbush, the shop became notorious as the scene of the shooting incident between deejays Super Cat and Nitty Gritty. Shelly continued to record with big hits such as Louie Rankin’s “Typewriter” and Sluggy Ranks dancehall recut of “My Time”. Becoming tired of NYC and business there Shelly relocated back home to Jamaica and around 2008 Super Power closed down due to financial problems. According to Striker Lee Shelly is still only semi-retired, running a restaurant and cook shop, although now 81 years of age he is still in good health and now resides in the desirable Norbrook Heights area in the parish of St. Andrew.



Rebel Rock is an excellent addition to the Pressure Sounds catalogue and the album comes with CD booklet sleevenotes by Steve Barker and excellent pictures from the period. The vinyl album is a single Lp format.

Reviews

Third World All Stars — Rebel Rock

Joe O'Donnell, Dec 17, 2013
I've had an abiding love for reggae since first hearing "The Harder They Come" sound track and the first three Bob Marley & the Wailers Island l.p.'s in the early '70's.In recent years I've developed a growing appreciation for "instrumental" Jamaican music, especially from that era. The musicians from that time played with an intensity and skill that can never be matched by a computer program or drum machine. A straight instrumental(as opposed to a "dub") showcases the players prowess, and, lets face it, some of the '70's paeans to herb and dreadlocks can sound somewhat dated, at least to this late-fifties set of ears, having long ago forsworn ganja for fine ale and (unwillingly) joined the ranks of the "bald heads". The tracks never grow old, however.
This "Pressure Sounds" release was recorded in the "Golden Era" in Britain with Jamaican ex-pats like Rico Rodriguez on trombone and Tyrone Downie (of Wailers fame) on keyboards. The rhythms are mostly from an Errol Dunkley l.p. (that I admit I've never heard) but if it's half as good as this set I'd like to find it.
I've CRANKED the cd in my car going to and from work for the last week or so, it never fails to lighten my load.
My only complaint is the playing time, the cd clocks in at less than 29 minutes. Surely "Pressure Sounds" could have found some additional material from the same producer to "sweeten the pot?"
No matter, if you love '70's reggae, or are a fan of horn-driven music of any genre, you need to hear this disc.

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